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pretty bad
Typical Repair Cost:
Average Mileage:
160,000 miles
Total Complaints:
2 complaints

Most Common Solutions:

  1. not sure (2 reports)
1996 Chevrolet Blazer electrical problems

electrical problem

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1996 Chevrolet Blazer Owner Comments

problem #2

Jun 012010


  • 160,000 miles


head lights, the back windshield wiper stopped working, blinkers stopped working when a friend changed the think wire in the dash board it was rusted and broke apart.

- , Rossville, GA, USA

problem #1

Nov 012007

Blazer LS 4.3L Vortec V6

  • Automatic transmission
  • 160,000 miles

During 1995-97, Chevy Blazers came with two different types of headlight options. One is the sealed beam assembly (what mine came with), and the other was composite lamps, in which you can remove the bulbs without removing the headlight lens.

The problem with the first type is that the lights are extremely dim. Added to the problem are those STUPID Daytime Running Lamps (DRLs), which are unnecessary and cause more problems than they're worth. I want to know who the idiot was that decided to impose these blinding, energy-hogging devices on everybody who buys a car! The other reason it's a stupid idea is because a lot of drivers (my wife included) don't realize that only the headlights come on, so your taillights are still off, even if it's dark outside, rainy or foggy. For that reason, I feel cars WITH DRLs are more dangerous than cars without.

ANYWAY...that's not even my point. Because of the dimming problem, I purchased a kit online that supposedly allows you to convert the sealed beam lamps to composites.

Problem #1: The bulb sockets DID NOT FIT, so I had to cut off the old ones, buy the right sockets, and splice them on.

Problem #2: The wiring harness for the sealed lamps simply does not like to be tampered with. I spent HOURS upon HOURS trying to keep the lamps from tripping the circuit breaker, which causes the lights to blink off and on, repeatedly. This is because a short somewhere in the system causes the wiring to overheat, thus tripping the breaker.

Problem #3: Finally I bought a new wiring harness from a junkyard, off a '96 Sonoma. It will fit, but the frigging ABS system is bolted on OVER the wiring harness, meaning I must remove the brake system before I can even remove the old wiring. This is something I do not want to tamper with at all, and it seems so not worth the trouble.

SO...after all this f---ing trouble, I must run the lights at DRL power (which equals half high-beam power) in order to keep the blinking problem from happening -- meaning I'm RIGHT BACK TO SQUARE ONE. Before I attempt to replace the harness, I will first replace the headlight switch wiring, which is much easier and cheaper. If this solves the problem, then I stand corrected. Otherwise, just picture me flashing both middles at GM.

By the way, my actual cost was more like $150. I forgot that I replaced the headlight switch already, because the first one burned and blew. (This is why I'm now replacing the wiring behind it.) Also, I bought a harness that came from a '98+ truck, which plug in differently than the '97- trucks. Hopefully I can sell it off, but I won't bet on it. Argh, argh, argh...

- , Baltimore, MD, USA

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