If you find CarComplaints.com is helpful ... We rely completely on word of mouth. Talk about us on Facebook, Twitter, tell your mother-in-law. Help us help more people.

9.6

really awful
Typical Repair Cost:
$700.00
Average Mileage:
83,600 miles
Total Complaints:
5 complaints

Most Common Solutions:

  1. repair intakes and other destroyed parts (4 reports)
  2. replace intake manifold gasket (1 reports)
2001 Chevrolet Monte Carlo engine problems

engine problem

Find something helpful? Spread the word.
Get notified about new defects, investigations, recalls & lawsuits for the 2001 Chevrolet Monte Carlo:

Unsubscribe any time. We don't sell/share your email.

2001 Chevrolet Monte Carlo Owner Comments

problem #5

Oct 012009

Monte Carlo LS 3.4L

  • Automatic transmission
  • 100,000 miles

A D V E R T I S E M E N T S

Cracked upper manifold intake. Failed intake gaskets. Time money and repair. Poor Poor Poor....This was my second and last Chevy. I'm glad to be free of the slavery of Chevy defects now that the car has been sold.

- , Mattapoisett, MA, USA

problem #4

Mar 172009

Monte Carlo LS 3.4L 3400 V6

  • Automatic transmission
  • 75,000 miles

This is just way beyond normal wear and tear for this intake manifold gasket to go with the mileage on this vehicle!! Unfortunately, this was in part due to the Dex-cool being left in the vehicle long past 5 years, hence the fluid turning into acid!! Also with the cheap thin gasket that GM used didn't help matters...!!! Bought this car in Oct of 2008 with 64,000 miles on it and had to put over $2,000 in it! Some of the parts were replacement parts and others were parts that normally would've lasted much longer than the mileage that the car is at now! All of the problems that happened with this car became triggered when I tried to flush the radiator which in turn triggered the coolant temp sensor to go along with the thermostat. Then the blower motor resister on the heater fan blew out!! The catalytic converter went not long after!! But now besides the intake going I'm in the process of having some mechanics work on it much more cheaply than a regular garage, I have an electrical problem with the car. I'm pretty sure my body control module is going bad!! Unfortunately its a dealer only part! I've already priced the part which runs about $200 not including labor....another boatload of money I'm dumping into this car I thought I was getting a deal for when I bought it for $7100! :( Most of this we can blame on the GM for using cheap parts and the whole dex-cool antifreeze for being left in the cars much longer than 2 years! Hope all of this fixes the problem...I really can't afford another car right now...:(

Update from Aug 31, 2009: Replacing the intake manifold gasket took care of the coolant level sensor light coming on, the oil in the coolant recovery tank, and flushing the dex-cool out and putting regular antifreeze in the car. The electrical problem which caused the flickering lights and door lights locking/unlocking was the Body Control Module. Good thing I was able to do a portion myself and my friends were able to help with the rest, otherwise it would've been alot more money! Costed around $600 for intake manifold upper and lower gasket, bolt set, valve cover gaskets, plenum gasket, coolant flush. Costed around $300-350 for the BCM to get fixed. The Catalytic Converter costed around $250 plus $70 for a new oxygen senor that goes on the Cat. The blower motor resistor costed aroun $45 and the thermostat under $15, coolant temp sensor $40

- , Cleveland, OH, USA

problem #3

Jun 292008

Monte Carlo SS V6

  • Automatic transmission
  • 98,000 miles

click to see larger images

intake manifold failure intake manifold failure intake manifold failure

Went out about 10:30 PM to make a quick run to the store to get some things for work in the morning. Car was acting like the battery was weak and wasn't starting so I popped the hood, checked the terminals for any corrosion or looseness. Battery is new, only about 6 months old. Went grab the battery charger, and before I hooked it up I decided to try and start it one more time. That's when all hell broke loose. I turned the ignition and BOOM! Scared the crap outta me. It was very loud, sure it woke a few of the neighbors. It cracked the plastic engine cover, and when I pulled it off I saw the damage to the plenum (see photos). There were pieces everywhere. Good thing no one was standing there and luckily for me it didn't catch on fire. I work 12 hour shifts and haven't had time to repair it yet. Found this website via Google and I see I'm not alone with this issue. Will try to contact GM, because I haven't found any recall info on this, but I haven't checked with my VIN yet. Let's just say I'm not a happy camper right now.

- , Laplace, LA, USA

problem #2

Dec 272007

Monte Carlo SS V6

  • Automatic transmission
  • 45,000 miles

A cold morning start and suspected dead battery ended in an explosion and fire under the open hood of my 2001 Monte SS. What a pain in the ass. You would think they could make a car that would last.

- , Fairbanks, Alaska, USA

problem #1

Oct 272007

Monte Carlo SS 3.8L V6

  • Automatic transmission
  • 100,000 miles

Went to start vehicle on a cold, Saturday morning. A fresh battery has been installed, but no ignition whatsoever. Turned key several times before popping the hood to check battery terminals. Returning to driver's seat, turned key, and heard a neighborhood wakening explosion.

Not knowing what had happened, I went around to the front of the vehicle to find engine parts all over the driveway and yard. Closer inspection revealed the engine intake manifold exploded. Various other engine parts were damaged as a result. Anyone standing in front of the vehicle would have been severely injured or worse.

No choice but to have it towed to a local mechanic. Everyone at shop was at a loss to explain what happened, only that it would cost $1700+dollars to repair. My own investigation revealed that this problem has been occurring to a variety of Chevy vehicles as a result of faulty plastic intake manifolds that are unable to handle a "backfire" type explosion. Few injuries have resulted from these scenarios because hoods are usually down during the cold start when the explosion happens. My particular VIN number was not included in recalls regarding this problem. It appears as if the recalls, a result of NHTSA investigations, should be expanded before someone really gets injured.

The shame is that up until then, I really enjoyed the car. I had no choice but to fix it, but won't feel completely comfortable until GM include this model in their recall and reimburses me for the costs involved in their faulty manufacturing.

- , Bastrop, TX, USA

Not what you are looking for?