Huge win for car owners! All TSBs to be made public. The Center for Auto Safety just made the NHTSA (US Government) make public the full text of all TSBs from now on. They are the same organization that has petitioned the NHTSA & filed lawsuits to protect car owners over exploding gas tanks & other major safety issues. Whenever you drive in your car, you are safer thanks in part to a lot of work over the years by this small but very effective consumer advocacy group.

Please take a moment & say thank you by donating $5 or whatever you can to the Center for Auto Safety.


really awful
Crashes / Fires:
0 / 0
Injuries / Deaths:
1 / 0
Average Mileage:
25,000 miles

About These NHTSA Complaints:

This data is from the NHTSA — the US gov't agency tasked with vehicle safety. Complaints are spread across multiple & redundant categories, & are not organized by problem.

So how do you find out what problems are occurring? For this NHTSA complaint data, the only way is to read through the comments below. Any duplicates or errors? It's not us.

2006 Honda Pilot seat belts / air bags problems

seat belts / air bags problem

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2006 Honda Pilot Owner Comments

problem #1

Dec 092007

Pilot 6-cyl

  • Automatic transmission
  • 25,000 miles


Traveling on a desolate highway, I heard my son whimper in the back seat. To my horror, I saw that he had tangled the seatbelt around his neck and was being lifted from his seat by it. My husband pulled off the road and we lunged back to release the belt. We then realized that he was not trapped by his own seatbelt but by the seatbelt designed for a center passenger in the second row. This belt comes down from the ceiling and connects at the seat to a latch designed without a quick release button. The latched belt had been resting against the seat behind my son's right shoulder. Playing with that belt, he had pulled it far enough to activate the retraction feature. Then he wrapped it around his head. When it began to tighten, he panicked, and it slipped down around his neck and tightened more. My husband and I grabbed the belt where it came out of the ceiling to stop it from retracting, but it was already too tight to get over his head. We were struggling to think straight. Neither of us knew how to detach the belt and we were trying to find something to cut it. Realizing the danger he was in, my son started squirming more. In calming him, we calmed ourselves a little. Thankfully, I remembered a friend mentioning he had found in the owner's manual how to detach the belt from the latch by sticking a key in a notch on the latch. I grabbed the keys from the ignition and popped the latch. My son was safe. Had only one parent been in the car, he would not have been able to hold the belt to keep it from retracting and reach the keys in the ignition - let alone find the very brief mention of this belt's operation in the user's manual. A driver could be unaware of this happening right behind him. My son nearly died with us helplessly standing by. Another child should not have to die for this design flaw to be recalled and corrected ( Please recall this dangerous seatbelt configuration. Thank you.

- Fort Myers, FL, USA

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