Huge win for car owners! All TSBs to be made public. The Center for Auto Safety just made the NHTSA (US Government) make public the full text of all TSBs from now on. They are the same organization that has petitioned the NHTSA & filed lawsuits to protect car owners over exploding gas tanks & other major safety issues. Whenever you drive in your car, you are safer thanks in part to a lot of work over the years by this small but very effective consumer advocacy group.

Please take a moment & say thank you by donating $5 or whatever you can to the Center for Auto Safety.


fairly significant
Crashes / Fires:
0 / 0
Injuries / Deaths:
0 / 0
Average Mileage:
9,200 miles

About These NHTSA Complaints:

This data is from the NHTSA — the US gov't agency tasked with vehicle safety. Complaints are spread across multiple & redundant categories, & are not organized by problem.

So how do you find out what problems are occurring? For this NHTSA complaint data, the only way is to read through the comments below. Any duplicates or errors? It's not us.

2010 Audi A4 transmission problems

transmission problem

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2010 Audi A4 Owner Comments

problem #3

Jul 072011

A4 4-cyl

  • 23,500 miles


Driving to work on a country roadway, passed a vehicle and began to pull back into my lane, releasing the gas pedal, but the Audi 2010 A4 continued to accelerate even after braking, speeds in excess of 85-90 mph. Brakes functioned, pulled over, stopped car. Looked down, nothing interfering with the gas pedal. Restarted car, speedometer needle jumped to 7000-8000 RPM, car revved. Needed to get the car to a safe location, proceeded to drive down the road with the brake pedal depressed, brakes began smoking but made it to a MINImart, parked and stopped car. Car towed to dealership, dealership said there was nothing wrong with the car. Contacted Audi of America, they reviewed the records and said that there was nothing wrong with the car. Vehicle accelerated to high rate of speed despite driver's attempts to reduce speed. Have not driven vehicle since this incident on 7/7/11. No prior problems, but since I stopped the vehicle and looked down at the gas pedal, there was nothing in the way which would have caused the vehicle to accelerate. Dealership states no codes were thrown and nothing shows up.

- Linden, CA, USA

problem #2

May 012010


  • 1,000 miles
I have a 2010 Audi A4 with the "multitronic" cvt transmission. When the vehicle is on an incline, the car rolls-back (or forward) when in drive, much like a car with a manual transmission. I have taken the car in for service and was told that this behavior is "normal" and functioning "as designed." While this has not caused an accident, this sort of behavior has the potential to cause collisions with the car behind (or in front) when on an incline, grade, hill, parking garage, parking lot, etc. This behavior has cause frightening situations in which I've had to slam on the brakes for fear of hitting the car behind (or in front) of me. This has also caused the driver of the other vehicle to honk in fear of getting hit. I have not observed similar behavior in vehicles with traditional manual or automatic transmissions. This behavior seems to be limited to Audi with cvt transmissions. I have been able to reproduce the same behavior on a friend's 2009 Audi A4 with the same transmission.

- Miami, FL, USA

problem #1

Jan 152010


  • 3,100 miles
The 2010 Audi A4 2.0T which I leased lunges forward every time it is down shifted in triptronic mode (manually shifting the automatic transmission). Today, I reported the defect to the service writer scott summerfield at mcdonald Audi in littleton co and he told me he was aware of it and that he thought Audi might be working on a "fix" for it. I think you should compel Audi to replace the transmissions because the lunging is a potentially life threatening defect. The manual shifting mode of the automatic transmission is used mainly on unsafe steep mountain roads to avoid riding the brake on a downhill grade and to acquire greater control of the vehicle on slippery terrain where the possibility of a fatal accident such as going over a cliff is great.

- Newport Beach, CO, USA

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