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10.0

really awful
Crashes / Fires:
0 / 0
Injuries / Deaths:
2 / 0
Average Mileage:
87,952 miles

About These NHTSA Complaints:

This data is from the NHTSA — the US gov't agency tasked with vehicle safety. Complaints are spread across multiple & redundant categories, & are not organized by problem.

So how do you find out what problems are occurring? For this NHTSA complaint data, the only way is to read through the comments below. Any duplicates or errors? It's not us.

2001 Subaru Forester fuel system problems

fuel system problem

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2001 Subaru Forester Owner Comments

problem #6

Jan 012016

Forester

  • 180,000 miles

A D V E R T I S E M E N T S

When the temperature gets cold and I turn on the defrost to warm up the car while parked I can smell gas in the vehicle. It goes away once I start driving. This is a problem many Subaru owners have because a hose loosens and allows gas to leak out. Once the car warms up the hose tightens and the problem goes away. This can potentially cause my car to catch on fire.

- Portland, OR, USA

problem #5

Dec 012009

Forester

  • 95,000 miles
Whenever the outside temperature drops below 20 degrees Fahrenheit, there is a strong odor of gasoline in and around the car. When taken to a mechanic, I was informed that all of the hose clamps on the fuel lines were loose. They were then tightened but every time the outside temperature drops, it happens again. It happens whether parked outside or in a garage.

- Archbold, OH, USA

problem #4

Dec 012013

Forester

  • miles
Subaru Forester smells of gas inside cab when weather is cold. Gas leak visible first time it occurred in 2013. I tightened a clamp and leak stopped. This winter I cannot see the leak, but the fuel smell overtakes my car about 5 minutes into warming up. Eventually it dissipates but I do believe that there is a leak somewhere in the vehicle. This seems to be epidemic in Subaru.

- Parkersburg, WV, USA

problem #3

Jan 272014

Forester

  • 97,000 miles

A D V E R T I S E M E N T S

When it is below 25 degrees Fahrenheit, fuel lines and related components (including retaining clips and fittings) leak gasoline, causing gas fumes to enter the passenger compartment. This problem is sometimes referred to as a fuel line seep. Fumes then enter the passenger compartment via the heating ventilation system or through general ambient entry. Even when the heat in the passenger compartment is off, fumes enter the compartment. This exposes passengers to harmful carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons as well as posing a fire risk. This happens at all speeds from stand-still to 75 mph. In moderate cold (25-15 degrees Fahrenheit), the leaking stops after the engine has warmed. In colder temperatures, the leaking continues no matter how long I drive the car. The problem can be temporarily solved by tightening the hose clamps on the fuel lines, but when the temperature drops again, the hose clamps must again be tightened. Some of the clamps are underneath engine components that are difficult to remove, so the process is very time intensive and does not always stop the fumes. This is a commonly discussed topic in automotive discussion boards online. Therefore, I believe it is widespread. Here are several examples: www.subaruforester.org/vbulletin/F88/gasoline-odor-inside-cabin-45495/ www.subaruforester.org/vbulletin/F87/smell-gas-cold-starts-41319/ community.cartalk.com/discussion/1986611/cold-weather-gas-smell-2003-Subaru-Forester.

- Wheaton, MD, USA

problem #2

Jan 042012

Forester

  • 90,000 miles
When it is below 25 degrees Fahrenheit, fuel lines and related components (including retaining clips and fittings) leak gasoline, causing gas fumes to enter the passenger compartment. This problem is sometimes referred to as a fuel line seep. Fumes then enter the passenger compartment via the heating ventilation system or through general ambient entry. Even when the heat in the passenger compartment is off, fumes enter the compartment. This exposes passengers to harmful carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons as well as posing a fire risk. Both my husband and I have experienced headaches and nausea from the fumes since winter 2012 when our Forester first started leaking. This happens at all speeds from stand-still to 75 mph. In moderate cold (25-15 degrees Fahrenheit), the leaking stops after the engine has warmed. In colder temperatures, the leaking continues no matter how long I drive the car. The problem can be temporarily solved by tightening the hose clamps on the fuel lines, but when the temperature drops again, the hose clamps must again be tightened. Some of the clamps are underneath engine components that are difficult to remove, so the process is very time intensive and does not always stop the fumes. This is a commonly discussed topic in automotive discussion boards online. Therefore, I believe it is widespread. Here are several examples: www.subaruforester.org/vbulletin/F88/gasoline-odor-inside-cabin-45495/ www.subaruforester.org/vbulletin/F87/smell-gas-cold-starts-41319/ community.cartalk.com/discussion/1986611/cold-weather-gas-smell-2003-Subaru-Forester.

- Waterbury, VT, USA

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problem #1

Jul 142011

Forester 4-cyl

  • 65,715 miles
Driving N on I5 highway when car made noises, pulled over & would not start again. Towed in. Was told that engine was dead. Car had just been serviced by dealer. Had to buy new engine. Subaru would not take any responsibility. Car had very low mileage & was in good shape. When doing research, found that this was an ongoing and common problem with all vehicles with 2.5L engine and due to defective head gasket.

- Los Angeles, CA, USA

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