Huge win for car owners! All TSBs to be made public. The Center for Auto Safety just made the NHTSA (US Government) make public the full text of all TSBs from now on. They are the same organization that has petitioned the NHTSA & filed lawsuits to protect car owners over exploding gas tanks & other major safety issues. Whenever you drive in your car, you are safer thanks in part to a lot of work over the years by this small but very effective consumer advocacy group.

Please take a moment & say thank you by donating $5 or whatever you can to the Center for Auto Safety.


really awful
Crashes / Fires:
0 / 0
Injuries / Deaths:
0 / 0
Average Mileage:
0 miles

About These NHTSA Complaints:

This data is from the NHTSA — the US gov't agency tasked with vehicle safety. Complaints are spread across multiple & redundant categories, & are not organized by problem.

So how do you find out what problems are occurring? For this NHTSA complaint data, the only way is to read through the comments below. Any duplicates or errors? It's not us.

2003 Buick Park Avenue engine problems

engine problem

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2003 Buick Park Avenue Owner Comments

problem #2

Feb 212008

(reported on)

Park Avenue 6-cyl

  • Automatic transmission
  • miles


2003 Buick Park Avenue with leaking intake gasket. Consumer states that dealer told him this was a common occurrence. Consumer would like General Motors to make the repairs at no cost to him.

- Mount Sinai, NY, USA

problem #1

Aug 072003

Park Avenue 6-cyl

  • Automatic transmission
  • 0 miles
I recently received a letter from GM stating that there may be a problem with coolant leaks around gaskets at the upper intake manifold or at the lower intake manifold which might "cause high engine temperatures". the letter says it is a "voluntary customer satisfaction program". the suggested fix is to take the vehicle in to the local dealer and have them change some of the fasteners and then "add cooling system sealant" to the radiator. It seems to me that putting cooling system sealant in a brand new car (and thus reducing the life of the radiator) is an unacceptable fix for a possible gasket problem. I would think that the company needs to replace the intake manifold gaskets instead, if they are the faulty part. However, when I called the number that GM supplied they said that they would not replace the gasket and that if we did not have the repair done as stated in their letter and the gasket subsequently failed after the warranty period was over, we would have to pay the full cost of the repairs. It appears that this might be something that NHTSA needs to check into as a potential recall for all of the cars with this type of engine sold through GM and provide the customer with an acceptable fix for the problem without gumming up the radiator on a car with less than 7,000 miles on it. Please advise me of my options with the above problem. I made my best effort to solve it with the company and got a poor option as a solution to the problem. I don't know who else to talk with. Thank you in advance for looking into this situation.

- Conway, AR, USA

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